8/11/2005

Sweet spot

What a head shot in Sun-Times with the Lynn Sweet column!  Handsome, no-nonsense woman with great hair, teeth, eyes showing through business-like specs, lots of white space, six by four and a half inches.  It’s of Christine Cegelis, with whom I have not been familiar, not having followed Illinois congressional politics carefully.  She lost to Henry Hyde last election with 44.2 percent of the vote — “surprising,” says Sweet, whose own columnist’s head shot, one and a half inch square, is dwarfed by that of her very attractive subject.

However, as an avid Sun-Times reader, I want to know whom to praise for the Cegelis shot.  Alas, I can find no credit for it, such as I find on the previous page (smaller) of the better known Condoleeza Rice, not near as striking as the Cegelis shot.  Thank Mark Wilson/Getty Images for it anyhow.  Scott Olson/Getty Images and Carlos Osorio/AP are two others whom we can thank, for shots that go with stories out of Baghdad and Wilmington Del. respectively. 

And on it goes throughout the paper.  Pix are i-d’d as by so-and-so of such-and-such.  But for this Lynn Sweet column all about a candidate running for office, chattily filling us in on her with result that we think highly of her and like her Air America connection and will give her money, we have this beautiful shot, provided by . . . whom?  By the candidate's media firm, Adelstein etc., whose Adelstein is quoted calling her Republican opponent "an extreme right-winger," I say, and why not?  With a “positive” column goes a positive picture.  But why not give Adelstein credit?

1 comment:

Not Miner said...

Maybe someone can explain why Sweet is both a reporter and a columnist, on one hand supposedly writing fairly, impartially, objectively, etc. about Washington matters, and then turning around and doing a column expressing her views (thinly disguised in this case) about Washington in a column? At least readers know where she is comig from.

Maybe this is part of the program of turning the Sun-Times into a newspapers of columns and not much else.